Using the “Adze” of the Hawk Head

Screen shot 2019-06-10 Hawk Peeling 8.13.15 AM
Carpeting and other bulky finish flooring materials can often be sliced into smaller, more easily managed sections using the sharp cross-cutting rib on the back of the adze.

PEELING-UP FINISHED FLOORING. As used here, peeling refers to pulling apart various layers of an assembly. A commonly encountered example is separating finish flooring materials (carpeting, sheet flooring materials, resilient tiles, ceramic tiles, slate, etc.) from their structural subflooring. These materials are generally secured in some manner.  The seams are so narrow and tight, that an overhaul tool’s prying/pulling end(s) often can’t get between them with sufficient purchase to separate them.

Fitting into tight spaces is one of the Hawk head’s strengths. The durable edge-holding of its special stainless steel alloy takes and holds whatever edge the user wants– anything from blunt to literally razor sharp.

The angle of the adze was chosen to allow use of the adze for peeling from virtually any position, standing, kneeling, or even prone.  Once  materials begin to separate, the user has several options:

  • Break flooring materials into small individual pieces (using the Hawk’s chisel tip or transverse blade) followed by a series of peeling and breaking/tearing strokes– this is often best when dealing with brittle materials such as ceramic tile, tightly glued resilient or carpet tile, or thin or patterned hardwood floors.
  • Take the material up as a single piece, by rotating the tool head 180 degrees and using the transverse blade to drag or roll the material out of the way.
  • Move the material in small sections by using the adze and the sharp cross-cutting rib inside it to slice cohesive materials such as carpeting into smaller, more manageable parts (see photo above).

PULLING TRIM (AT WAIST-LEVEL OR ABOVE). As used here, peeling refers to pulling apart various layers of an assembly. A commonly encountered example is separating finish flooring materials (carpeting, sheet flooring materials, resilient tiles, ceramic tiles, slate, etc.) from their structural subflooring. These materials are generally secured in som